The most comprehensive collection of Design Principles on the Internet.

823 design principles and counting.

06 Dec 2017

5 Principles for First Time Experience

For many product teams increasing conversion is difficult as users drop off early in the lifecycle. Often users don’t know how to get started. They get stuck, feel frustrated, stop using the product all together, and don't benefit from the promises of the product designed for them.


The principles

  1. Start with basics

    Prepare users by covering the basics before introducing advanced features and concepts.
    Introduce complexity later on.

    It is not

    Throwing them in the deep end expecting them to swim.

  2. Keep it focused

    Prioritize content, create hierarchy, make it bite sized. Deliver education at the right moment in the right way.

    It is not

    Overwhelming for feels too early that’s not relevant or too late.

  3. Be inclusive

    People have different learning styles. Some prefer reading, some prefer learning through videos or listen to audio. Some people are more tech savvy and some are less. Some places have worse connectivity so you’re videos might not load - that’s when articles or audio is best. Design for inclusivity and a global audience (if your product is global).

    It is not

    One size fits all.

  4. Be supportive

    Be supportive especially of new users - it’s their first time. Be there for them when something comes up good or bad. Celebrate their first time successes and help them recover from the low points.

    It is not

    Something just happen and they have no idea what it’s about for how to fix it.

  5. Show progress

    Show people where they are at and how far they have to go. Keep users informed and motivate by showing progress and levels. If they’ve mastered something celebrate it!! Make it a moment.

    It is not

    Unknown trajectory or just another event.

  1. Start with basics

    Prepare users by covering the basics before introducing advanced features and concepts.
    Introduce complexity later on.

    It is not

    Throwing them in the deep end expecting them to swim.

  2. Keep it focused

    Prioritize content, create hierarchy, make it bite sized. Deliver education at the right moment in the right way.

    It is not

    Overwhelming for feels too early that’s not relevant or too late.

  3. Be inclusive

    People have different learning styles. Some prefer reading, some prefer learning through videos or listen to audio. Some people are more tech savvy and some are less. Some places have worse connectivity so you’re videos might not load - that’s when articles or audio is best. Design for inclusivity and a global audience (if your product is global).

    It is not

    One size fits all.

  4. Be supportive

    Be supportive especially of new users - it’s their first time. Be there for them when something comes up good or bad. Celebrate their first time successes and help them recover from the low points.

    It is not

    Something just happen and they have no idea what it’s about for how to fix it.

  5. Show progress

    Show people where they are at and how far they have to go. Keep users informed and motivate by showing progress and levels. If they’ve mastered something celebrate it!! Make it a moment.

    It is not

    Unknown trajectory or just another event.

Tags

  • Onboarding
  • UX

Related collections

Shneiderman's "Eight Golden Rules of Interface Design"

8 principles


Ben Shneiderman

20 Guiding Principles for Experience Design

20 principles


Whitney Hess

Don Normans Principles of Design

6 principles


Don Norman

37 Signals Principles

8 principles


37 Signals

Ten Principles of Simplicity

10 principles


Jay Selway