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06 Jul 2021

ZapLabs design principles

These are the design principles of ZapLabs.

There's a really interesting article on the InVision blog about the process they used to come up with them. One interesting twist is that they placed the principles in a pyramid similar to Maslow's pyramid of needs.

Make sure to check the article out in the source link below.

Source: Determining your design principles


The principles

  1. Know your users

    Understand user needs. Understand what their needs are before being able to deliver the right solution. Know your users by understanding their goals and frustrations through interviews.

    Show empathy by adapting to user needs. Be aware of user needs and actual behavior. Manage your user’s expectations and understand that you are not your us

  2. Clarity

    Clarity is all about the relationships between elements. Consider the relationships between items on the page and structure the page based on importance.

    Create structure and hierarchy. Provide timely feedback that engenders confidence in the system. Users should know the consequence of each action they take.

  3. Consistency

    Consistent interfaces. Allow users to develop usage patterns. Use standard controls and gestures consistently so that they behave the way people expect.

    Consistent language. Use the same term when referring to a particular action or object, and communication pieces to avoid confusion.

    Consistent use of established patterns. Users look for patterns they already know to shorten the learning curve and understand new experiences across programs.

  4. Efficiency

    *User experience is seamless.' It works across various screen sizes, platforms, and products. Efficiency matters when people are likely to use the app a lot and they are prepared to spend time learning it.

    Efficient systems respect your time. Efficiency reflects the drive to get users to their goal by designing the shortest amount of time/number of clicks on task.

    Leverage technology to drive efficiency. Use technology to adapt to existing behavior instead of making users adapt to computers.

  5. Aesthetics

    First impressions matter. A system that looks beautiful can further engender confidence and trust in the system

    Aesthetics is a quality that people recognize, want, and need. It’s seen in design and in life, and it makes the use of that interface enjoyable.

    Delightful. Your customers will look forward to using your product when it’s pleasant to use.

1. Know your users

Understand user needs. Understand what their needs are before being able to deliver the right solution. Know your users by understanding their goals and frustrations through interviews.

Show empathy by adapting to user needs. Be aware of user needs and actual behavior. Manage your user’s expectations and understand that you are not your us

2. Clarity

Clarity is all about the relationships between elements. Consider the relationships between items on the page and structure the page based on importance.

Create structure and hierarchy. Provide timely feedback that engenders confidence in the system. Users should know the consequence of each action they take.

3. Consistency

Consistent interfaces. Allow users to develop usage patterns. Use standard controls and gestures consistently so that they behave the way people expect.

Consistent language. Use the same term when referring to a particular action or object, and communication pieces to avoid confusion.

Consistent use of established patterns. Users look for patterns they already know to shorten the learning curve and understand new experiences across programs.

4. Efficiency

*User experience is seamless.' It works across various screen sizes, platforms, and products. Efficiency matters when people are likely to use the app a lot and they are prepared to spend time learning it.

Efficient systems respect your time. Efficiency reflects the drive to get users to their goal by designing the shortest amount of time/number of clicks on task.

Leverage technology to drive efficiency. Use technology to adapt to existing behavior instead of making users adapt to computers.

5. Aesthetics

First impressions matter. A system that looks beautiful can further engender confidence and trust in the system

Aesthetics is a quality that people recognize, want, and need. It’s seen in design and in life, and it makes the use of that interface enjoyable.

Delightful. Your customers will look forward to using your product when it’s pleasant to use.

Tags

  • Product Design

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